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Photon Brings Fresh Eyes To Egypt’s Rich Sights

Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon
Photo Credit: Photon

It’s hard to capture Egypt’s multiplicity inside a tiny viewfinder. The jostle of its past and present within the swirl of its many cultures make it difficult to snap portraits that don’t leave something out. Now, however, one ambitious photography collective wants to catch it all—and judging from its work so far, it’s doing just that.

Photon is the brainchild of Hazem Khaled and Hosam Manadily, and it seeks to educate Egyptians’ mental perspectives as much as their visual techniques. “The goal is to make everyone see the beauty of our country, which we never see,” the co-founders explain. So every Saturday, its members embark on a new adventure, from urban safaris to workshops in editing.

The club’s explorations of well-known and out-of-the-way places operate like collective treasure hunts, with enthusiastic participants fanning out and vying to outdo each other’s creativity. The result is a roving archive of wonder, mixing the intricate grandeur of Egypt’s architectural monuments with the vivacity of a new-found social cohesion. From the hushed splendor of a venerable mosque to the cheerful bustle of a sidewalk “ful” stand, Photon’s best shots bring a fresh eye to the familiar and illuminate the overlooked with original affection.

For more information – facebook.com/ThePhoton

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Jennifer MacKenzie

Poet, writer and teacher Jennifer MacKenzie grew up on Bloomcrest Dr. in Bloomfield Hills, MI, which inspired her to wonder about places with patterns other than floral. Following her education at Wesleyan University's College of Letters and the University of Iowa's Writers Workshop, she followed a zig-zag course that included a pilgrimage across the top of Spain and a long sojourn in Syria in pursuit of the language of Muhammad al-Maghout and Moudthaffar al-Nawwab. While in Damascus she completed the books of poems "Distant City" and "My Not-My Soldier" (forthcoming from Fence Books) and edited the magazine Syria Today. Her poems and essays can be found in numerous journals including the Kenyon Review online, Guernica, Quarterly West, and Lungfull. She currently lives in New York.

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